Exploring new possibilities in cloud-based education technology

Editor’s note: We’re at Google Cloud Next ‘19 this week in San Francisco. If you’re attending Next ’19, visit the Industry Solutions booth and follow along on Twitter and Facebook for more updates.

The best educators foster a culture of curiosity. They know that students who ask questions are the ones who grow up to become researchers, inventors and life-long learners. At Google Cloud Next ‘19, we’re showcasing how teachers can integrate the right technology to help them engage all students, while encouraging agency and a love of learning.

As of today, 90 million teachers and students are using G Suite for Education worldwide. As the numbers grow, so do we, adapting our solutions to meet the changing needs of learners, educators, researchers and administrators everywhere.

Many of these new features are ones that educators and administrators can use to deliver more personalized learning, in ways that work for each individual student. Here’s a look at the latest G Suite updates that bring cloud-based enhancements to the classroom.

Learning for all
New updates to Hangouts Meet and Slides make learning more accessible for everyone.

Closed captions in Google Slides (only on Chrome web browsers) use machine learning to turn on automated closed captioning when you’re presenting. Captions are currently available in the U.S. in English only.

Also rolling out today, automatic live captions in Hangouts Meet can be turned on to add captioning to virtual professional development sessions or remote lessons. Powered by Google’s speech recognition technology, this feature provides support and the ability to follow along in Hangouts Meet, especially for those who are hearing impaired or English as a New Language Learners.

Starting today, you can insert audio files directly into Slides from Drive, enhancing presentations with short or long clips, and especially useful for flipped learning lessons.

Now you can turn on closed captions in Hangouts Meet
Now you can turn on closed captions in Hangouts Meet.

Fostering better collaboration
We’re also making a few updates to support the collaboration that happens within G Suite.

Collaborate on Microsoft Office lets students and educators work together on Microsoft Office files in real-time, directly from G Suite. This means that starting today, you can edit Office files from Google Docs, Slides and Sheets, without having to worry about converting file types. This also allows you to tap into G Suite features, like the Explore, while using Office.

Now in beta, Hangouts Chat in Gmail replaces Classic Hangouts in Gmail with an improved chat experience, making it easier for students to collaborate with each other or with their instructors.

Available now, Hangouts Meet on Jamboard lets educators deliver lessons remotely to students who are unable to come into school, teach higher education classes and hold meetings directly from Jamboard.

Google Voice gives educators and administrators a unique phone number that works from anywhere, on any device, perfect for communication with parents and guardians. Google’s AI is built in to help you transcribe voicemails and block spam calls. Voice takes care of assigning a phone number, porting and billing, making it easy for admins to provision and manage. Google Voice is available now as an add-on subscription.

Boosting productivity
Educators, researchers and IT administrators need access to data to help them make well-informed decisions. The following new updates help institutions use data to work smarter and build a more effective learning and teaching experience.

Coming soon, connected Sheets will let you collaborate on up to 10 billion rows of BigQuery data right from within Sheets, without needing SQL. You can use the Sheets interface to view learner data (like grades), analyze progress with formulas and pivot tables and visualize results with charts.

Schedule send in Gmail, a feature that’s live today, lets you schedule email to be sent at a more appropriate date or time, which is helpful if you’re working across time zones, or want to avoid interrupting someone’s vacation.

Comparison in Docs, which will be available soon, streamlines marking assignments by letting you compare two Google Docs and review the differences as suggested edits in a new Doc.

Also coming soon, themes allows you to quickly style multiple Sheets element—like charts and pivot tables. This helps keep style consistent throughout your spreadsheets.

With metadata in Drive, you’ll soon be able to edit the metadata, or information that provides information about other data, of files in Drive to better organize and search your educational materials. For example, you can create a saved search to instantly find all files tagged “lesson plan” or aligned to a certain standard.

Connected Sheets expands the capabilities of Sheets to up to 10 billion rows
Connected Sheets expands the capabilities of Sheets to up to 10 billion rows.

Expanding the reach of educators
G Suite Enterprise for Education provides best-in-class teaching and learning tools for education institutions. Now, with Google Voice and updates to Hangouts Meet, educators, researchers and administrators can reach even more learners. Below are three updates that will be available soon.

Public live streaming means you can now live stream over Hangouts Meet to up to 100,000 out-of-domain users, especially useful for distance learning or online course offerings.

With Hangouts Meet, we’ve increased the number of participants to up to 250, perfect for large online lectures across time zones.

Mobile audio allows you to use your mobile device on audio-only mode during lessons over Hangouts Meet. This makes lessons more accessible, even on poor network connections.

These updates open new possibilities for our 90 million teachers, administrators, and learners using G Suite for Education.

More science in more places with Science Journal and Google Drive

We first launched Science Journal in 2016 so that students, teachers and science enthusiasts could conduct hands-on science experiments using their phones, tablets and Chromebooks. Since then, we’ve heard one request from teachers loud and clear: students need to be able to access their experiments no matter what device they’re using or where they are. Learning doesn’t just happen in the classroom, it happens outdoors, at home and everywhere in between. So today, we’re bringing a new Google Drive syncing feature to Science Journal. Now, you can access your experiments on any device using a Google Account.

Drive Sync with Science Journal

Accessing your experiment from Google Drive is easy: you can sign in with any Google Account and all of your experiments will be backed up to a Science Journal folder in Google Drive. If you have existing experiments on your device, you can add them to your Google Drive account. Many viewing, sharing and collaboration features will be coming to Science Journal in the future.

If you don’t have a Google Account or you don’t want to sign in, you can still use Science Journal—but your data won’t be saved to Google Drive. If your school doesn’t have Google Accounts, you can sign up for G Suite for free—just remember that G Suite for Education accounts need a domain administrator to activate Science Journal in the G Suite Admin console.

In addition to today’s syncing feature, we have a lot of new resources in Science Journal, just for teachers. Check out the new fundamentals and advanced professional development modules in the Google for Education Teacher Center. For introductory science activities, head over to Scholastic’s Science in Action initiative, and for more hands-on physics content, you can pre-order Arduino’s Science Kit. If you’re looking for new ways to enhance Science Journal’s capabilities, check out Vernier’s Go Direct line of classroom sensors. Science Journal activities can now be found on the Workbench site, and you can always find activities and more on the Science Journal website and get support in our new help center. Finally, the Science Journal iOS app is now open source, so the app’s code is available to the public, making it a great opportunity for students, hobbyists and companies who want to see how Science Journal works and even contribute code back to us.
Our goal with Science Journal is to help you enhance scientific thinking and data literacy in your classroom. Stay tuned for more updates in the coming months, and let us know what you think on our forum. You can tweet at us @GScienceJournal, or just use the #myScienceJournal hashtag on Twitter.

At Tech Day, hundreds of kids dive deep into STEM

On April 13 and 14, Google’s Mountain View campus suddenly had a much younger population. That’s because 875 high school students stopped by for Google’s fourth annual Tech Day. Over 150 Google and Alphabet volunteers joined the kids in 129 interactive STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities to empower them with knowledge and inspire them to get started in disciplines like computer science.

But Tech Day isn’t just about fun and games. The event was designed for students who may not have regular access to technology classes at their schools. The students who attend Tech Day have very little experience in technology and computing, but they might leave the event inspired to pursue a new career path.

Software engineer Matthew Dierker started Tech Day in 2016, based on a similar event at his alma mater. He started his university’s program along with a friend at the University of Illinois, and decided to bring the idea to the Bay Area. “I thought it’d be a natural fit here, given the large number of passionate engineers in Silicon Valley, plus I like organizing stuff,” he says. “I gathered a few friends and that effort found a good home in Google’s engEDU initiative.”

Students learn technology at Google's Tech Day event.
Photo by Tim Andres

Since then, Tech Day has expanded to a full weekend, with three times the students it had in 2016. And the list of activities has grown beyond just classes. Kids can now participate in games and breakout sessions that help them loosen up around technology. The event’s organizers say one of the biggest obstacles the kids face is not seeing all the career options they may have. “They might think they can’t work in any role in tech just because they struggle with math. This isn’t the case,” says Melaena Roberts, a software engineer and volunteer team lead.

User experience designer Bingying Xia says she volunteers at Tech Day because she’d like to let students know that there’s more to tech than computer science. “The world also needs smart, creative designers to find user problems and come up with innovative design solutions,” she says.

Even if students aren’t interested in pursuing a career in the industry, one of Tech Day’s biggest goals is to make technology seem less intimidating. “Technological skills apply to any job, even outside of the technology industry. Tech isn’t all sitting at a desk in front of a computer,” Matthew says. “If that inspires enough curiosity to keep someone learning, the skills they learn will almost certainly be useful regardless of what they wind up doing.”

Organizers and volunteers really invest themselves during Tech Day to give students as much knowledge as they can, but they learn a lot from the students, too. Melaena says student feedback has informed how Tech Day has changed over the years. Volunteer Volker Grabe, a software engineer at Waymo, says he notices kids speak their minds more as the day goes on and they realize the day isn’t as tough or competitive as they expected.

Their main takeaway from the students? They’re curious about tech and excited to learn outside the classroom. “I saw raw passion, curiosity, and excitement in the students,” says volunteer Hannah Huynh, a product design engineer. “I was impressed that these students were so dedicated to give up their weekend to learn about engineering.”

Exploring new possibilities in cloud-based education technology

The best educators foster a culture of curiosity. They know that students who ask questions are the ones who grow up to become researchers, inventors and life-long learners. At Google Cloud Next ‘19, we’re showcasing how teachers can integrate the right technology to help them engage all students, while encouraging agency and a love of learning.

As of today, 90 million teachers and students are using G Suite for Education worldwide. As the numbers grow, so do we, adapting our solutions to meet the changing needs of learners, educators, researchers and administrators everywhere.

Many of these new features are ones that educators and administrators can use to deliver more personalized learning, in ways that work for each individual student. Here’s a look at the latest G Suite updates that bring cloud-based enhancements to the classroom.

Learning for all

New updates to Hangouts Meet and Slides make learning more accessible for everyone.

Closed captions in Google Slides (only on Chrome web browsers) use machine learning to turn on automated closed captioning when you’re presenting. Captions are currently available in the U.S. in English only.

Also rolling out today, automatic live captions in Hangouts Meet can be turned on to add captioning to virtual professional development sessions or remote lessons. Powered by Google’s speech recognition technology, this feature provides support and the ability to follow along in Hangouts Meet, especially for those who are hearing impaired or English as a New Language Learners.

Starting today, you can insert audio files directly into Slides from Drive, enhancing presentations with short or long clips, and especially useful for flipped learning lessons.

Fostering better collaboration

We’re also making a few updates to support the collaboration that happens within G Suite.

Collaborate on Microsoft Office lets students and educators work together on Microsoft Office files in real-time, directly from G Suite. This means that starting today, you can edit Office files from Google Docs, Slides and Sheets, without having to worry about converting file types. This also allows you to tap into G Suite features, like the Explore, while using Office.

Now in beta, Hangouts Chat in Gmail replaces Classic Hangouts in Gmail with an improved chat experience, making it easier for students to collaborate with each other or with their instructors.

Available now, Hangouts Meet on Jamboard lets educators deliver lessons remotely to students who are unable to come into school, teach higher education classes and hold meetings directly from Jamboard.

Google Voice gives educators and administrators a unique phone number that works from anywhere, on any device, perfect for communication with parents and guardians. Google’s AI is built in to help you transcribe voicemails and block spam calls. Voice takes care of assigning a phone number, porting and billing, making it easy for admins to provision and manage. Google Voice is available now as an add-on subscription.

Boosting productivity

Educators, researchers and IT administrators need access to data to help them make well-informed decisions. The following new updates help institutions use data to work smarter and build a more effective learning and teaching experience.

Coming soon, connected Sheets will let you collaborate on up to 10 billion rows of BigQuery data right from within Sheets, without needing SQL. You can use the Sheets interface to view learner data (like grades), analyze progress with formulas and pivot tables and visualize results with charts.

Schedule send in Gmail, a feature that’s live today, lets you schedule email to be sent at a more appropriate date or time, which is helpful if you’re working across time zones, or want to avoid interrupting someone’s vacation.

Comparison in Docs, which will be available soon, streamlines marking assignments by letting you compare two Google Docs and review the differences as suggested edits in a new Doc.

Also coming soon, themes allows you to quickly style multiple Sheets element—like charts and pivot tables. This helps keep style consistent throughout your spreadsheets.

With metadata in Drive, you’ll soon be able to edit the metadata, or information that provides information about other data, of files in Drive to better organize and search your educational materials. For example, you can create a saved search to instantly find all files tagged “lesson plan” or aligned to a certain standard.

Expanding the reach of educators

G Suite Enterprise for Education provides best-in-class teaching and learning tools for education institutions. Now, with Google Voice and updates to Hangouts Meet, educators, researchers and administrators can reach even more learners. Below are three updates that will be available soon.

Public live streaming means you can now live stream over Hangouts Meet to up to 100,000 out-of-domain users, especially useful for distance learning or online course offerings.

With Hangouts Meet, we’ve increased the number of participants to up to 250, perfect for large online lectures across time zones.

Mobile audio allows you to use your mobile device on audio-only mode during lessons over Hangouts Meet. This makes lessons more accessible, even on poor network connections.

Account Hijacking Forum OGusers Hacked

Ogusers[.]com — a forum popular among people involved in hijacking online accounts and conducting SIM swapping attacks to seize control over victims’ phone numbers — has itself been hacked, exposing the email addresses, hashed passwords, IP addresses and private messages for nearly 113,000 forum users.

On May 12, the administrator of OGusers explained an outage to forum members by saying a hard drive failure had erased several months’ worth of private messages, forum posts and prestige points, and that he’d restored a backup from January 2019. Little did the administrators of OGusers know at the time, but that May 12 incident coincided with the theft of the forum’s user database, and the wiping of forum hard drives.

On May 16, the administrator of rival hacking community RaidForums announced he’d uploaded the OGusers database for anyone to download for free.

The administrator of the hacking community Raidforums on May 16 posted the database of passwords, email addresses, IP addresses and private messages of more than 113,000 users of Ogusers[.]com.

“On the 12th of May 2019 the forum ogusers.com was breached [and] 112,988 users were affected,” the message from RaidForums administrator Omnipotent reads. “I have uploaded the data from this database breach along with their website source files. Their hashing algorithm was the default salted MD5 which surprised me, anyway the website owner has acknowledged data corruption but not a breach so I guess I’m the first to tell you the truth. According to his statement he didn’t have any recent backups so I guess I will provide one on this thread lmfao.”

The database, a copy of which was obtained by KrebsOnSecurity, appears to hold the usernames, email addresses, hashed passwords, private messages and IP address at the time of registration for approximately 113,000 users (although many of these nicknames are likely the same people using different aliases).

Legal Threats Make Powerful Phishing Lures

Some of the most convincing email phishing and malware attacks come disguised as nastygrams from a law firm. Such scams typically notify the recipient that he/she is being sued, and instruct them to review the attached file and respond within a few days — or else. Here’s a look at a recent spam campaign that peppered more than 100,000 business email addresses with fake legal threats harboring malware.

On or around May 12, at least two antivirus firms began detecting booby-trapped Microsoft Word files that were sent along with some variation of the following message:

{Pullman & Assoc. | Wiseman & Assoc.| Steinburg & Assoc. | Swartz & Assoc. | Quartermain & Assoc.} <[email protected]>

Hi,

The following {e-mail | mail} is to advise you that you are being charged by the city.

Our {legal team | legal council | legal departement} has prepared a document explaining the {litigation | legal dispute | legal contset}.

Please download and read the attached encrypted document carefully.

You have 7 days to reply to this e-mail or we will be forced to step forward with this action.

Note: The password for the document is 123456

The template above was part of a phishing kit being traded on the underground, and the user of this kit decides which of the options in brackets actually get used in the phishing message.

Yes, the spelling/grammar is poor and awkward (e.g., the salutation), but so is the overall antivirus detection rate of the attached malicious Word document. This phishing kit included five booby-trapped Microsoft Word documents to choose from, and none of those files are detected as malicious by more than three of the five dozen or so antivirus products that scanned the Word docs on May 22 — 10 days after they were spammed out.

According to both Fortinet and Sophos, the attached Word documents include a trojan that is typically used to drop additional malware on the victim’s computer. Previous detections of this trojan have been associated with ransomware, but the attackers in this case can use the trojan to install malware of their choice.

Also part of the phishing kit was a text document containing some 100,000 business email addresses — most of them ending in Canadian (.ca) domains — although there were also some targets at companies in the northeastern United States. If only a tiny fraction of the recipients of this scam were unwary enough to open the attachment, it would still be a nice payday for the phishers.

First American Financial Corp. Leaked Hundreds of Millions of Title Insurance Records

The Web site for Fortune 500 real estate title insurance giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] leaked hundreds of millions of documents related to mortgage deals going back to 2003, until notified this week by KrebsOnSecurity. The digitized records — including bank account numbers and statements, mortgage and tax records, Social Security numbers, wire transaction receipts, and drivers license images — were available without authentication to anyone with a Web browser.

First American Financial Corp. Image: Linkedin.

Santa Ana, Calif.-based First American is a leading provider of title insurance and settlement services to the real estate and mortgage industries. It employs some 18,000 people and brought in more than $5.7 billion in 2018.

Earlier this week, KrebsOnSecurity was contacted by a real estate developer in Washington state who said he’d had little luck getting a response from the company about what he found, which was that a portion of its Web site (firstam.com) was leaking tens if not hundreds of millions of records. He said anyone who knew the URL for a valid document at the Web site could view other documents just by modifying a single digit in the link.

And this would potentially include anyone who’s ever been sent a document link via email by First American.

KrebsOnSecurity confirmed the real estate developer’s findings, which indicate that First American’s Web site exposed approximately 885 million files, the earliest dating back more than 16 years. No authentication was required to read the documents.

Many of the exposed files are records of wire transactions with bank account numbers and other information from home or property buyers and sellers. Ben Shoval, the developer who notified KrebsOnSecurity about the data exposure, said that’s because First American is one of the most widely-used companies for real estate title insurance and for closing real estate deals — where both parties to the sale meet in a room and sign stacks of legal documents.

“Closing agencies are supposed to be the only neutral party that doesn’t represent someone else’s interest, and you’re required to have title insurance if you have any kind of mortgage,” Shoval said.

You give them all kinds of private information and you expect that to stay private.

“The title insurance agency collects all kinds of documents from both the buyer and seller, including Social Security numbers, drivers licenses, account statements, and even internal corporate documents if you’re a small business. You give them all kinds of private information and you expect that to stay private.”

Shoval shared a document link he’d been given by First American from a recent transaction, which referenced a record number that was nine digits long and dated April 2019. Modifying the document number in his link by numbers in either direction yielded other peoples’ records before or after the same date and time, indicating the document numbers may have been issued sequentially.

The earliest document number available on the site – 000000075 — referenced a real estate transaction from 2003. From there, the dates on the documents get closer to real time with each forward increment in the record number.

A redacted screenshot of one of many millions of sensitive records exposed by First American’s Web site.

As of the morning of May 24, firstam.com was returning documents up to the present day (885,000,000+), including many PDFs and post-dated forms for upcoming real estate closings. By 2 p.m. ET Friday, the company had disabled the site that served the records. It’s not yet clear how long the site remained in its promiscuous state, but archive.org shows documents available from the site dating back to at least March 2017.

First American wouldn’t comment on the overall number of records potentially exposed via their site, or how long those records were publicly available. But a spokesperson for the company did share the following statement:

“First American has learned of a design defect in an application that made possible unauthorized access to customer data.  At First American, security, privacy and confidentiality are of the highest priority and we are committed to protecting our customers’ information. The company took immediate action to address the situation and shut down external access to the application. We are currently evaluating what effect, if any, this had on the security of customer information. We will have no further comment until our internal review is completed.”

I should emphasize that these documents were merely available from First American’s Web site; I do not have any information on whether this fact was known to fraudsters previously, nor do I have any information to suggest the documents were somehow mass-harvested (although a low-and-slow or distributed indexing of this data would not have been difficult for even a novice attacker).

Should Failing Phish Tests Be a Fireable Offense?

Would your average Internet user be any more vigilant against phishing scams if he or she faced the real possibility of losing their job after falling for one too many of these emails? Recently, I met someone at a conference who said his employer had in fact terminated employees for such repeated infractions. As this was the first time I’d ever heard of an organization actually doing this, I asked some phishing experts what they thought (spoiler alert: they’re not fans of this particular teaching approach).

John LaCour is founder and chief technology officer of PhishLabs, a Charleston, S.C. based firm that helps companies educate and test employees on how not to fall for phishing scams. The company’s training courses offer customers a way to track how many employees open the phishing email tests and how many fall for the lure.

LaCour says enacting punitive measures for employees who repeatedly fall for phishing tests is counterproductive.

“We’ve heard from some of our clients in the financial industry that have similar programs where there are real consequences when people fail the tests, but it’s pretty rare across all types of businesses to have a policy that extreme,” LaCour said.

“There are a lot of things that organizations can do that aren’t as draconian and still have the desired effect of making security posture stronger,” he said. “We’ve seen companies require classroom training on the first failure, to a manager has to sit through it with you on the second time, to revoking network access in some cases.”

LaCour said one of the most common mistakes he sees is companies that purchase a tool to launch simulated phishing campaigns just to play “gotcha” with employees.

“It really demotivates people, and it doesn’t really teach them anything about how to be more diligent about phishing attacks,” he said. “Each phishing simulation program needs to be accompanied by a robust training program, where you teach employees what to do when they see something phishy. Otherwise, it just creates resentment among employees.”

Rohyt Belani, CEO of Leesburg, Va.-based security firm Cofense (formerly PhishMe), said anti-phishing education campaigns that employ strongly negative consequences for employees who repeatedly fall for phishing tests usually create tension and distrust between employees and the company’s security team.

“It can create an environment of animosity for the security team because they suddenly become viewed as working for Human Resources instead of trying to improve security,” Belani said. “Threatening people usually backfires, and they end up becoming more defiant and uncooperative.”

Cofense provides a phish reporting system and encourages customers to have their employees flag suspected phishing attacks (and tests), and Belani said those employee reports can often stymie real phishing attacks.

“So what happens a lot of times is a person may click on link in a real phishing email, and three seconds later realize, ‘Oops, I shouldn’t have clicked, let me report it anyway’,” Belani said. “But if that person knew there was a punitive angle to doing so, they’re more likely not to report it and to say, ‘You know what, I didn’t do it. Where’s the proof I clicked on the link?’” 

Did you take your school’s survey?

I had the opportunity to take the statewide school survey five times, for each of my kids in school. I had a different response for the elementary, middle and high school. Here are the questions that were on my district’s survey:

  1. My child’s school provides me with resources and information to support my child’s learning at home.
  2. My child’s school tells me how my child is doing in class in a way that makes sense to me.
  3. My child’s school gives me opportunities to talk to teachers about how my child is doing.
  4. At least one caring adult in our school knows my child well.
  5. My child is safe at school.
  6. My child’s school invites me to participate in the school’s activities.
  7. My child’s school keeps me informed about news and events.
  8. My child’s school principal is accessible.

I was given the option to respond to each question with; strongly agree, agree, neutral,  disagree, strongly disagree, or unsure.

I really liked the questions. It is important for schools to provide information to parents about news and events, how to reach the teachers and principal, and school activities. It is also important for the students and parents to feel like their school is a safe place.

Our schools do a great job communicating with me via email and newsletters (sometimes too much). I attend parent teacher conferences and receive weekly updates on all of my kids grades.

The one question that really resonated with me, was No. 4. It is important to have teachers who know my child well and care about them. I know my elementary and middle school kids have caring adults who know my kids … but I do not believe my high school kids feel like their teachers know and care about them. I hear stories about teachers who are rude or who look down on my high school kids. I hope they each have at least one teacher who knows my child and cares about their success. I will ask them tonight.

Were your school’s survey questions the same or different? What questions felt really important to you?

There’s still time to take the survey. Contact your school for the link.

Top 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn Cyber Security

Are you amazed by the latest technological advancements?

Do you think that Cyber Security is one of the coolest jobs on earth?

Do you also want to learn Cyber Security and build a career in this domain?

If it is a “YES” for all the three questions above, then you have landed in the perfect place.

In the current scenario, Cyber Security jobs are one of the most in-demand jobs to begin your career with.

The Cyber Security industry has seen potential growth in the last few years and has created promising employment opportunities.

Due to rapid and frequent cyber attacks across the globe, business, organizations and governments are looking for Cyber Security professionals that can prevent cyber attacks and tackle the existing ones.

As a matter of fact, the need for Cyber Security professionals has outpaced the number of applicants. This makes it a career worth considering.

Here are the top 10 reasons why you should learn Cyber Security

Top 10 Reasons to Learn Cyber Security

1. High Demand for Cyber Security Experts

High Demand for Cyber Security Experts

High Demand for Cyber Security Experts

The use of the Internet has increased considerably over the past decade. From ordering food to shopping, everything has become online.

While on one hand, this technological revolution has proved to be a boon, on the other hand, the internet has become more vulnerable to cyber attacks.

This has indeed created an infinite need for Cyber Security to prevent the web from online fraud and crime.

With technological advancement in the internet space, Cyber Security has become one of the most lucrative career options today and the demand for Cyber Security professionals is increasing day by day.

The demand for Cyber Security professionals is so high that they are getting hired at 12 times the rate than the rest of the related jobs and this is why you should learn Cyber Security.

Adding to the facts, the global demand for Cyber Security professionals is expected to rise to 6 million by the end of 2019 and a shortage of 1.5 million Cyber Security is expected to be witnessed.

2. Good Salary Packages

Good Salary Packages

Good Salary Packages

Who doesn’t want a good salary package? Almost everyone and getting a good salary doesn’t hurt.

When it comes to building a career in Cyber Security, experience and knowledge are a must, however, starting a career with a good salary package is also a dream of many.

Therefore, a simple rule of demand and supply has been applied here. The demand for Cyber Security professionals is increasing day by day while the supply is considerably less.

So, employers are ready to pay higher salaries to Cyber Security professionals. This yet another reason why you should go ahead and learn Cyber Security.

As a coin has two sides, the world is filled with two kinds of people. One who uses internet optimally and positively to make the world a better place in terms of technology.

On the other hand, there are those who want to harm others by taking undue advantage of the internet.

Thus, to prevent themselves from online and cyber attacks, businesses and governments are looking for experts who can protect their systems from cyber criminals and hire the best human resource, they are willing to pay more.

By being a skilled Cyber Security professional with high demand, you can also negotiate your salary with any employer.

An increased Cyber Security demand has proved to be profitable for a lot of aspirants who had or have an interest in cyberspace.  

Since the gap between the demand and supply of Cyber Security professionals is high, it has led to a higher pay rate for Cyber Security professionals.

3. Travel the World with Cyber Security

Travel the World with Cybersecurity

Travel the World with Cyber Security

Are you looking forward to a job where you can travel around the globe? If yes, then Cyber Security is the right career path for you.

Cyber Security is a global issue and is not just confined to a particular geographical area.

Also, the rise in increasing cyber attacks has been happening worldwide which have certainly surpassed the supply of Cyber Security professionals aimed at preventing these cyber attacks.

Furthermore, this increased demand for Cyber Security professionals has just not taken place at one particular place but has also created employment opportunities overseas as well.

Experts in this niche are also expected to travel overseas to cater to the needs the organizations that match their skill set. Are you now convinced to learn Cyber Security?

4. Cyber Security is an Evergreen Industry

Gone were the days when Cyber Security was not a big deal. Today, in this ever-evolving technology era, the internet has become a priority for a majority of people.

Internet helps them to take care of their daily needs whether personal or professional. However, hackers across the world are simultaneously using the internet to fulfil their needs but in an unethical manner.

As cyber attacks are getting more prevalent these days, a continuous need for Cyber Security experts is also increasing. As a result of this, the job profile of a Cyber Security professional has become more stable than before.

You might be thinking that it is difficult to learn Cyber Security & cope up with the updates and trends of Cyber Security.

But the point is that there is nothing much that has changed in the Cyber Security domain, hence, you can easily begin your career as a Cyber Security professional.

5. Requirements are Basic

Requirements are Basic

Requirements are Basic

If you think that building a career in Cyber Security is daunting & difficult, you are possibly wrong. To become a Cyber Security professional, you absolutely don’t have to go to some college for a 4-year degree course or get a handful year of experience.

You can step up in the Cyber Security domain as a professional with some knowledge of IT space and an authorised Cyber Security certification.

The Cyber Security certification will help you to gain Cyber Security insights right from strategy to execution thereby building a solid background in Cyber Security.

Remember, getting a certification in Cyber Security is crucial as it increases your resume value and gives an authority of you being a Cyber Security professional.

The eligibility criterion for getting a certification in Cyber Security has been kept basic with an aim to bridge the huge gap between the demand and supply of Cyber Security professionals.

If you are a fresher or even a college student, you can go ahead with this career without really worrying about anything.

6. Mathematics is not Needed

Mathematics is not Needed

Mathematics is not Needed

Do you have arithmophobia? Are you afraid of the number? Well, in that case, you just need to relax.

It is true that maths as a subject is quite challenging for a lot of students. Some of the working professionals are also afraid of maths.

It is true that not everyone has an aptitude for maths and thus does not let them go ahead with a career of their choice as maths is involved in it.

If you are also afraid of maths and want to build a career in Cyber Security, you can surely go ahead with it without being upset about the maths part.

Cyber Security is absolutely free from the involvement of mathematics & so if you don’t like maths, you need not worry about getting a certification in Cyber Security.

Rather, you can spend your time in mastering skills like networking & programming to build a career in a particular skill set.

7. Unlimited Career Growth Options

Unlimited Career Growth Options

Unlimited Career Growth Options

Cyber Security is expanding its horizon through various industries. This makes sure that is a perfect platform for growth in terms of career as well as learning opportunities.

These days, cyber attacks are getting smarter and faster. This arises the need for Cyber Security professionals to outsmart the hackers at a much more faster pace.

Businesses and governments are dependent on them for analysing & minimizing risk along with combating cyber attacks and preventing all types of vulnerabilities.

Tackling the cyber attacks are an outcome of continuous study, comprehensive research & optimal execution.

This proves that when you learn Cyber Security, you will be continuously knowing new things and gaining rich experience which is an add-on to your skill set.

8. Opportunities to work with High Profile Agencies

Work with High Profile Agencies

Work with High Profile Agencies

One of the best things about being a Cyber Security professional is that your chances of working with some of the biggest companies at many top positions in the world increases.

There is no restriction on the number of the organization that you can work with.

The demand for Cyber Security professionals has considerably increased across the globe. Thus, geographical hindrance is automatically cleared.

It has to be noted that the potential does not end here, experts in Cyber Security might also get the chance to work with some of the top-notch secret government & intelligence agencies like NSA, CBI etc along with Central Intelligence Agency, Department of Defense & various banks.

Sounds cool, isn’t it!

9. A Plethora of Industries to Choose from

If you are a Cyber Security professional, you are not just confined to one particular industry. While earlier the demand for Cyber Security professionals was restricted to certain industries like secret military agencies, government agencies, banks, hospitals, IT companies & schools.

But as the digital revolution has taken place, there have been advancements in the field of technology, data science and digital marketing.

This has opened the gates for Cyber Security professionals to enter any industry that wants to be digitally secure. Moreover, this is an outstanding reason for you to learn Cyber Security.

10. Learn “White-Hat” Hacking

“White-Hat” Hacking

“White-Hat” Hacking

With the expansion of Digitalization, internet marketing has become the first preference for almost everyone.

While on the positive side, it has created profitable opportunities for advertisers and marketers while providing promising career opportunities to a lot of people.

On the negative front, there has been an increase in the number of cyber crimes and attacks.

During the tenure of your Cyber Security certification, you will also get a chance to learn “white-hat” hacking.

If you learn Cyber Security & hacking, you will not only help yourself in building the right skill set but will also initiate an elevation in your resume value. This will make you the most wanted candidate from the employer’s point of view.